1 Matches (out of a total of 833 incidents)
  1. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    12/06/2004 Peterlee, England LOWT? 25 123 ?/? 28 #1113318
    DropZone.com Description: Andrew had not jumped in the UK before. He had previously jumped in Cyprus and more recently Florida. His last jump had been approximately four months prior to the accident.

    Andrew made an uneventful free fall descent, deployed his main parachute at the correct altitude, but possibly had difficulty locating the landing area. Between him and the landing area were a number of ‘National Grid’ power lines and two very large wind turbines. It was likely that Andrew decided not to attempt to fly his parachute over or past these hazards, as he was seen to be spiralling his parachute, and that he elected to land in a field to the west of them.

    The belief is that as he was getting closer to the ground, he may have noticed a wire fence in his flight path and then initiated a radical turn in order to avoid the hazard. He then struck the ground at high speed before fully completing the turn.

    Lessons:
    BPA Description: On Saturday 12 June 2004 an FAI ‘B’ Certificate parachutist, with 123 jumps, boarded a Dornier G92 aircraft along with thirteen other parachutists. Two Jumpmasters were nominated for the lift. The first was a member of a military parachute display team and the second was a member of the parachute centre.

    He had not jumped in the UK before. He had previously jumped in Cyprus and more recently Florida. His last jump had been approximately four months prior to the accident.

    The aircraft took off and flew to South Shields, where four members of the military team exited the aircraft at approximately 3,500ft to carry out a parachute display.

    The aircraft then flew back to the parachute centre, climbing to approximately 14,500ft AGL. A ‘jump run’ was commenced. The pilot switched on a red light in the aircraft cabin indicating this. Once the aircraft was at the estimated exit point, the light was changed to green and the parachutists on board started to exit. A four-person group exited first, followed by two parachutists jumping together. The next person to leave was the deceased. He was followed by another solo parachutist and finally by the last two parachutists, who were jumping together. There were approximately five-second intervals between groups and individual parachutists.

    He was carrying out a solo jump. The free fall part of which was not observed.

    All parachutists’ canopies were seen to deploy at the correct altitude (between 2-4000ft AGL), and all were observed to be flying correctly, though they were all some considerable distance from where it had been expected they would deploy their canopies.

    Because of the distance, his landing was not observed. Only two of the remaining parachutists were able to reach the intended landing area.

    Club members were dispatched, in various vehicles, to retrieve the parachutists. The police contacted the parachute centre to inform them that the body of a parachutist had been located, which was approximately 2,000 metres from the parachute centre, on a wind farm, some thirty metres from a wire fence and also approximately 100 metres from a wind turbine.

    BPA Conclusions:The ten parachutists exited the aircraft at the incorrect location. Possibly 30 – 45 degrees too far to the west and at least 1000 metres too deep.

    The deceased made an uneventful free fall descent, deployed his main parachute at the correct altitude, but possibly had difficulty locating the PLA. Between him and the PLA were a number of ‘National Grid’ power lines and two very large wind turbines. It was likely that he decided not to attempt to fly his parachute over or past these hazards, as he was seen to be spiralling his parachute, and that he elected to land in a field to the west of them.

    The Board believe that as he was getting closer to the ground, he may have noticed a wire fence in his flight path and then initiated a radical turn in order to avoid the hazard. He then struck the ground at high speed before fully completing the turn.

    Name Andrew Wilson